By Andrew Fenton/Getty ImagesFor more than two decades, a group of friends have spent hours on end in their backyard, shooting video and creating their own films and photographs.

They are the pioneers of what is now known as digital cinema, a field that has evolved into a billion-dollar industry in which companies from film makers to video creators make films that have been downloaded millions of times.

But while the film industry is booming, the process has also become fraught with ethical, legal and financial concerns.

How to create a film in three minutesThe concept of digital cinema began in 2007 when filmmaker and director John Cassavetes, who grew up in Chicago, decided to shoot his own films, starting with a short film called “Citizen Kane.”

The result is a documentary that explores the concept of “interchangeability,” a term Cassavettes uses to describe how a film’s format, color palette and editing tools can all be used to create something new.

For many filmmakers, the idea of creating a film without permission is a common one.

Cassavets says that even his own father, who is the director of the film “The Social Network,” gave him permission to edit his film for a television special.

And while Cassavetts, 51, says that he never used his personal assets to create his film, it is clear that he took risks.

He was involved in a lawsuit with the filmmaker, who he says was making a “false” claim that he had paid Cassavete $200,000 to make the film.

“There was no money involved,” he said.

“He had a very high-powered lawyer, but I never did anything to violate him.

He said, ‘Well, you can’t do that.

And the dispute became public, with the American Civil Liberties Union and a host of others demanding that Cassaveties release his film.”

Cassavetes said that he was never given a chance to negotiate.

And the dispute became public, with the American Civil Liberties Union and a host of others demanding that Cassaveties release his film.

The story of “Citizens Kane” was the inspiration for a documentary Cassavetis was producing called “The Film” that was released last month, and it offers a glimpse into the ethics of creating film in the digital era.

In a nutshell, Cassaveta said that it is a good thing to have a long shot when it comes to creating a work of art.

But the longer a project is taking, the more you’re sacrificing some artistic control.”

If you’re going to be creative, you’re really trying to be a lot more creative,” Cassavetzas said.”

If you’re taking risks, that’s not going have a lot to do with the quality of your film.””

And you can do a lot better.

If you’re taking risks, that’s not going have a lot to do with the quality of your film.”

A film’s quality, of course, is one of the most important factors in whether a film will be deemed worthy of copyright protection.

And that is where Cassavettas’ experience as a filmmaker comes in.

In 2005, he created “Cultured,” a documentary about the film festival circuit that featured interviews with film makers like Francis Ford Coppola, Quentin Tarantino, Spike Lee and Paul Thomas Anderson.

The film received a nomination for a best documentary award from the International Academy of Film and Television Arts, and was released in 2014.

Cassavettias film is about the experience of being an indie filmmaker and what it takes to create your own work.

In an interview with Vice last year, Cassaves said that the film’s goal was to show that “there’s a market for this, and people are willing to pay for it.”

“I was thinking, ‘Why don’t we do this?

“Why would I put money into it if it wasn’t going to sell?””

In the end, Cassavises film is more than a documentary, though. “

Why would I put money into it if it wasn’t going to sell?”

In the end, Cassavises film is more than a documentary, though.

It is a personal story about filmmaking, about the joys and the challenges of making films and a call to action for filmmakers everywhere.

In the movie, Cassavedt says that while his film was not intended to be commercially successful, it inspired a new generation of filmmakers to come to their senses.

“It was very much an expression of who I was, and a reflection of what I was doing, because it was not commercially viable,” he explained.

“I feel like we’re a very young industry, and so many people were willing to do this for free and because they believed in the creative value of the art form,” he continued.

“I think that the fact that this film was free, and that this idea of film was something that could be done for free, made a difference.”

He said that his film “cannot be compared to a film made in the early ’90s, which was, ‘Let’s go to the bar

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